Date   
locked Southgate Amateur Radio News RSS Feed - Tonga operation #southgatearcnews

Public@SouthBristolARC.groups.io Integration <Public@...>
 

Tonga operation Masa JA0RQV will be involved in an international project on Tonga between Nov. 24 and November next year

locked Southgate Amateur Radio News RSS Feed - Antarctic Activity Week 2020 #southgatearcnews

Public@SouthBristolARC.groups.io Integration <Public@...>
 

Antarctic Activity Week 2020 The 17th Antarctic Activity Week, will be on air between February 10-17th, 2020. It's time to book your special callsign. Launching the 17th AAW, the WAP (Worldwide Antarctic Program) invites all Radio Amateurs (OMs and SWLs) around the world, Clubs and Organizations as well as other important groups and individual operators WW (World-Wide), to join and share with us, this initiative

locked Southgate Amateur Radio News RSS Feed - The SARL Novice Award #southgatearcnews

Public@SouthBristolARC.groups.io Integration <Public@...>
 

The SARL Novice Award The Council has approved the SARL Novice Award. This award is available to holders of a South African Novice Licence (ZU) and is designed to encourage activity across four designated bands for this licence class

locked Southgate Amateur Radio News RSS Feed - Three contests this week #southgatearcnews

Public@SouthBristolARC.groups.io Integration <Public@...>
 

Three contests this week The last leg of the 2019 SARL Wednesday 80 meter Club Sprint takes place from 17:00 to 18:00 UTC today, Wednesday 20 November with CW and phone activity

locked Southgate Amateur Radio News RSS Feed - Amateur radio festival attracts 127 #southgatearcnews

Public@SouthBristolARC.groups.io Integration <Public@...>
 

Amateur radio festival attracts 127 The Daily Express reports the 10th Borneo Amateur Radio Festival (BARF) event which was held for the first time in Sabah, from Nov 1 to 3, attracted 127 participants

locked Southgate Amateur Radio News RSS Feed - Australian bush fires #southgatearcnews

Public@SouthBristolARC.groups.io Integration <Public@...>
 

Australian bush fires Our thanks must go out to the many people volunteering during this early fire season. It is no small thing to go out for extended periods to deal with emergency situations and to be in the first responder class as a volunteer

locked Southgate Amateur Radio News RSS Feed - GB7IC D-STAR repeater, reaches 3,000 D-STAR callsign registrations #southgatearcnews

Public@SouthBristolARC.groups.io Integration <Public@...>
 

GB7IC D-STAR repeater, reaches 3,000 D-STAR callsign registrations Icom UK have given us an update to a previous news item regarding D-STAR registrations from March 2019. At that time, their team had processed over 500 D-STAR registrations on their GB7IC repeater in just over six months

South Bristol ARC (Region 11) = #Calendar of Events #calendar

 

Ladies and gentlemen,

I am pleased to attach our calendar of events for the forthcoming month and quarter.  These events are open to all who wish to attend.

For those who have not received these files before there should be 3 files attached:

1. Evening_Post_A4_xxxxxxxx.pdf - This provides details of the events over the coming month including a brief description of the event.

2. Event_Calendar_A4_xxxxxxxx.pdf - This is the title and organiser of our planned events over the next 3 months

3. sbarc_xxx_xxx_xxxx.csv - This is a comma separated variable file giving full details of our events over the next 3 months including descriptions.

The first two files will require a PDF Reader or Viewer.  Free and Open Source programs or applications are available for all operating systems including: Windows, OSX, Linux, BSD, iOS, Android and others.

The third file is text comma separated variable file which can be read by almost any text editor or word processor but is best suited to spreadsheets and databases.

If for any reason these files are not attached to this e-mail you may download them from the following links:


Additionally we have a .iCal file for use with calendar applications which you may download from the following link:


We look forward to welcoming you to our meetings which are open to anyone who wishes to attend.

73

Andy
--
Andy Jenner G7KNA BEng CEng MICE
Hon. Sec.
for and on behalf of South Bristol Amateur Radio Club
Novers Park Community Centre
Rear of 122 - 124 Novers Park Road
Bristol BS4 1RN
http://www.sbarc.co.uk
Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/G4WAW


Group Guidelines #guidelines

Public@SouthBristolARC.groups.io Group Moderators <Public@...>
 

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Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

Andy G7KNA
 

Wasn't able to be operational for the 14:27 UTC pass either, working for a living sure restricts your free time!

--
Andy Jenner G7KNA
www.g7kna.co.uk ( http://www.g7kna.co.uk )
https://twitter.com/g7kna
www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner ( http://www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner )

Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

Andy G7KNA
 

Wasn't able to be operational during the 12:50 UTC pass due to attending a CPD event in house.

Still have the 14:27 UTC pass assuming transmissions are still occurring

73
--
Andy Jenner G7KNA
www.g7kna.co.uk ( http://www.g7kna.co.uk )
https://twitter.com/g7kna
www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner ( http://www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner )

Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

Andy G7KNA
 

Tried to get the 13:39 UTC pass from the works QTH car park yesterday (09/10/2019).

Not successful I'm afraid. I heard a very weak signal for possibly 3 or 4 minutes of the pass but was unable to decode anything this time.

Works QTH location is less than ideal being at low altitude and surrounded by manmade and natural topographic obstructions. 63 degrees above the horizon ought to have been viable at the peak of the pass so a bit disappointed especially as the same setup at a different location back in August did get a good partial image.

Debating whether or not to have a go at the 12:50 UTC and 14:27 UTC passes today. The first at 49 degrees maximum elevation isn't likely to be any better than yesterday but the second at 85 degrees is about as high as it can practically be.

I'll run a proper prediction for the Works QTH and see if I think either is viable. the 14:27 UTC pass is much closer to west - east than either yesterday or the 12:50 UTC pass which might be better for the works QTH location.

I'll report later with luck.

73
--
Andy Jenner G7KNA
www.g7kna.co.uk ( http://www.g7kna.co.uk )
https://twitter.com/g7kna
www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner ( http://www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner )

Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

 

ISS SSTV Oct 9 and 10
 
Russian cosmonauts are expected to activate Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmissions on 145.800 MHz FM from the International Space Station on Wednesday/Thursday, October 9/10.
 
This is the schedule for the planned activation of the MAI-75 SSTV activity from the ISS.
Oct 09 09:50-14:00 GMT
Oct 10 08:55-15:15 GMT

The usual table of passes is available at the Clubs Dropbox Folder which can be found here:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/i8jdu3xmmcagcir/AAAUHj3GC4qtxYfb693ui2G5a?dl=0

Transmissions will be sent on 145.800 MHz FM in the SSTV mode PD-120. Once received, images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php
 
ISS SSTV uses a Kenwood TM D710E transceiver which is part of the amateur radio station located in the Russian ISS Service Module.
 
Please note that SSTV events are dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and subject to change at any time. You can check for updates regarding planned operation at:
ISS Ham https://twitter.com/RF2Space
ARISS Status https://twitter.com/ARISS_status
ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/
AMSAT Bulletin Board http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb
 
Read the MagPi article Pictures from space via ham radio
https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/pictures-from-space-via-ham-radio/
 
ISS SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/
--
73

Hon Sec SBARC
for and on behalf of SBARC
https://www.sbarc.co.uk

Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

 

Two ISS SSTV events during July 29 - August 4

ISS Pass predictions are calculated for the South Bristol Clubhouse which should be more or less applicable to most members.  the further away you are from the Clubhouse the greater the error

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/i8jdu3xmmcagcir/AAAUHj3GC4qtxYfb693ui2G5a?dl=0

ARISS Russia is planning Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmissions on 145.800 MHz FM from the International Space Station 
 
Below is the scheduled for the planned activation of SSTV from the ISS. The first session is the routine MAI-75 activity that is only active for a few orbits. It appears that the most of the world (except N. America) will get a shot during the two day run. Some lucky operators along the east coast of North America should get a pass on July 29.
 
Inter-MAI-75 activity
(July 29) GMT 210/13:15 – SSTV activate
(July 29) GMT 210/21:25 – SSTV power down
 
(July 30) GMT 211/13:50 – SSTV power up
(July 30) GMT 211/19:30 – SSTV shutdown
 
The second event will be a world wide event running from August 1 through August 4 and the schedule is: 
 
ARISS SSTV activity
(Aug 01) GMT 213/09:40 – SSTV activate
(Aug 02) GMT 214/14:00 – SSTV check
(Aug 04) GMT 216/18:15 – SSTV shutdown
 
This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver.
 
It is anticipated that the SSTV mode used will be PD-120.
 
Please note that SSTV events are dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and subject to change at any time. You can check for updates regarding planned operation at:
ISS Ham https://twitter.com/RF2Space
 
Read the MagPi article Pictures from space via ham radio 
 
ISS SSTV info and links 

--
73

Hon Sec SBARC
for and on behalf of SBARC
https://www.sbarc.co.uk

Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

 

ARISS - RS0ISS - SSTV activity

ARISS Russia is planning SSTV test transmissions.
 
A Russian MAI-SSTV event is planned from the International Space Station for 

Monday, July 29 2019 from 13:15 - 21:25 UTC 
Tuesday July 30 2019 from 13:50 - 19:50 UTC.
 
Transmissions are expected to be at 145.800 MHz FM in SSTV mode PD120.
 
This session is the routine MAI-75 activity that is only active for a few orbits. It appears that the most of the world (except N. America) will get a shot during the two day run.

I've completed the usual orbital predictions based on the Clubhouse which will be reasonably close for most members although the further you are from the Clubhouse then the greater the error will be.

There are plenty of links and explanations from earlier in this thread that can be used as "How To" resources so I won't repeat them here this time.

The various .PDF, .HTML and .ODF spreadsheet can be found in the Public DropBox folder here:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/i8jdu3xmmcagcir/AAAUHj3GC4qtxYfb693ui2G5a?dl=0

--
73

Hon Sec SBARC
for and on behalf of SBARC
https://www.sbarc.co.uk

ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

 

Ladies and gentlemen,

ARISS Russia is planning Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmissions on 145.800 MHz FM from the International Space Station between Thursday April 11 2019 and Sunday April 14 2019.

As usual I have prepared a pass prediction list based on the Clubhouse which you can download from the following public folder:


The transmissions begin Thursday, April 11, 2019 around 18:00 UTC and run continuously until approximately 18:00 UTC on Sunday, April 14, 2019.

This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver.

Once the event begins the transmissions will be broadcast at 145.800 MHz using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Ham radio operators and other radio enthusiasts are invited to post the images they receive at
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Moreover, on request, ARISS SSTV Award Manager Slawek SQ3OOK will provide an SSTV Award, details at
https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

To submit a request, please follow this procedure:
1. Load your decoded images on the page:
https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/submit.php

2. Fill in the application form on the website:
https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and is subject to change at any time.

Please check the following for news and the most current information:
AMSAT-BB
https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb



You can use online radios to receive signals from the International Space Station: 
SUWS WebSDR located Farnham near London
http://farnham-sdr.com/
R4UAB WebSDR located European Russia
http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

I have previously provided details of how to receive these images and these instructions can be found in earlier posts in this Groups.io thread on the public discussion board run by the Club.

I won't repeat the instructions here, if you haven't already read them you're unlikely to do it this time and if you do need to refresh yourself then the earlier posts are still readable and perfectly adequate for this operation too.


73

Andy
--
Andy Jenner G7KNA BEng CEng MICE
Hon. Sec.
for and on behalf of South Bristol Amateur Radio Club
Novers Park Community Centre
Rear of 122 - 124 Novers Park Road
Bristol BS4 1RN
http://www.sbarc.co.uk
Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/G4WAW


Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

Andy G7KNA
 

Good job, if I do say so myself!

--
Andy Jenner G7KNA
www.g7kna.co.uk ( http://www.g7kna.co.uk )
https://twitter.com/g7kna
www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner ( http://www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner )

Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

 

Updated pass predictions:

<table>
<thead>
<tr><th>Date (UTC)</th><th>AoS<br/>Acquisition of Signal<br/>(Time UTC)</th><th>Duration<br/>(Hr:Min:Sec)</th><th>AoS<br/>Acquisition of Signal<br/>Azimuth or Bearing (Degrees)</th><th>Maximum Elevation<br/>(Degrees)</th><th>Maximum Elevation<br/>Azimuth or Bearing (Degrees)</th><th>LoS<br/>Loss of Signal<br/>Azimuth or Bearing (Degrees)</th><th>LoS<br/>Loss of Signal<br/>(Time UTC)</th></tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr><td>08/02/19</td><td>15:07:06</td><td>00:10:40</td><td>264</td><td>87</td><td>336</td><td>85</td><td>15:17:46</td></tr>
<tr><td>08/02/19</td><td>16:43:39</td><td>00:10:46</td><td>281</td><td>74</td><td>193</td><td>108</td><td>16:54:25</td></tr>
<tr><td>08/02/19</td><td>18:20:13</td><td>00:10:04</td><td>283</td><td>23</td><td>226</td><td>144</td><td>18:30:17</td></tr>
<tr><td>08/02/19</td><td>19:57:52</td><td>00:05:51</td><td>264</td><td>3</td><td>239</td><td>198</td><td>20:03:43</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>11:05:31</td><td>00:06:58</td><td>174</td><td>6</td><td>133</td><td>91</td><td>11:12:29</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>12:39:38</td><td>00:10:16</td><td>223</td><td>28</td><td>169</td><td>76</td><td>12:49:54</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>14:15:41</td><td>00:10:45</td><td>257</td><td>83</td><td>174</td><td>81</td><td>14:26:26</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>15:52:14</td><td>00:10:46</td><td>277</td><td>88</td><td>216</td><td>100</td><td>16:03:00</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>17:28:45</td><td>00:10:26</td><td>284</td><td>33</td><td>191</td><td>132</td><td>17:39:11</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>19:05:48</td><td>00:07:52</td><td>273</td><td>8</td><td>233</td><td>178</td><td>19:13:40</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>10:15:46</td><td>00:04:39</td><td>152</td><td>2</td><td>126</td><td>100</td><td>10:20:25</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>11:48:35</td><td>00:09:48</td><td>211</td><td>20</td><td>152</td><td>78</td><td>11:58:23</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>13:24:16</td><td>00:10:43</td><td>248</td><td>67</td><td>156</td><td>78</td><td>13:34:59</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>15:00:46</td><td>00:10:46</td><td>273</td><td>85</td><td>352</td><td>93</td><td>15:11:32</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>16:37:18</td><td>00:10:41</td><td>284</td><td>48</td><td>190</td><td>122</td><td>16:47:59</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>18:14:02</td><td>00:09:04</td><td>279</td><td>13</td><td>219</td><td>163</td><td>18:23:06</td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>

ISSPasses.html in the Public Dropbox Downloads folder has been updated too

--
73

Hon Sec SBARC
for and on behalf of SBARC
https://www.sbarc.co.uk

Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

Andy G7KNA
 

Southgate News reports a timing change for the planned SSTV broadcasts this weekend.

It is now anticipated that transmissions will commence at 14:00 UTC on Friday February 8 2019 (earlier than the originally announced 18:25 UTC) and continue until 18:30 UTC on Sunday February 10 2019 as originally planned.

I expect our erstwhile secretary will update the pass prediction table as a result of the earlier availability of the ISS
--
Andy Jenner G7KNA
www.g7kna.co.uk ( http://www.g7kna.co.uk )
https://twitter.com/g7kna
www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner ( http://www.linkedin.com/in/andywjenner )

Re: ARISS SSTV Transmissions #iss #sstv

 

ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday 08/02/2019 at 18:25 UTC and run through until Sunday 10/02/2019 at 18:30 UTC.

SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth; similar to pictures shared on cell phones using TWITTER or INSTAGRAM.

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.800 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter FM handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band (144.000MHz - 146.000MHz) in FM.

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) images see:
https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/
 
In addition, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included.

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at:
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at:
https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time.

Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@..., the ARISS Facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status.

Slow Scan Television (SSTV) is transmitted from the amateur radio station in the Russian Service Module of the International Space Station. The equipment used is a Kenwood D710 transceiver running about 25 watts output which provides a very strong signal enabling reception using simple equipment.

All you need to do to receive SSTV pictures direct from the space station is to connect the audio output of a scanner or amateur radio transceiver via a simple interface to the soundcard on a PC, iOS or Android device, and tune in to 145.800 MHz FM. You can even receive pictures by holding a mobile 'phone next to the radio loudspeaker.

Recommended decoding software (links not tested)

For iOS use "SSTV Slow Scan TV" by Black Cat Systems
https://itunes.apple.com/app/sstv/id387910013

For Android use "Robot36"
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=xdsopl.robot36&hl=en

For Windows use "MMSSTV" (see AMSAT UK link below for setup)
http://hamsoft.ca/pages/mmsstv.php

RX-SSTV is another Windows option. If you disable BPF (band pass filter I believe) on RX-SSTV it will decode them as sharp as MMSSTV. If the reception is noisy enable BPF and things will be smoothed out a bit. In that case the decode might look better than MMSSTV's decodes. They are easy to compare if you record your passes and decode them later.

For Mac OS X use "Multiscan 3B SSTV"
http://www.qsl.net/kd6cji/

For Linux use "QSSTV"
http://users.telenet.be/on4qz/qsstv/index.html

The ISS puts out a strong signal on 145.800 MHz FM and a 2m handheld with a 1/4 wave antenna will be enough to receive it. The FM transmission uses 5 kHz deviation which is standard in much of the world. In IARU Region 1 (British Isles, Europe, Africa) FM equipment is usually set by default to the narrower 2.5 kHz deviation.

Many FM rigs can be switched been wide and narrow deviation FM filters. For best results you should select the filter for wider deviation FM. Handhelds all seem to have a single wide filter fitted as standard.

During most of a pass the ISS may be more than 15 degrees above the horizon so an antenna with a high radiation angle will give better results. Simple antennas such as an outdoor 1/4 wave ground plane or dipole should give good results. Large 2m co-linear antennas don't work quite as well because their radiation pattern is concentrated at the horizon.

With PD120 it takes about 2 minutes to send an image. Since a typical pass can be 7 - 10 minutes a number of images can potentially be received during a single ISS pass. You'll also have a better chance of receiving images with less noise, or more complete image transmissions, as you're more likely to receive at least one image closer to the middle of the pass when the signal is strongest.

An ISS pass that goes right overhead (90 degrees elevation), lasts about 10 minutes. ISS SSTV transmit time and off time are usually setup to provide the radio with a 50% duty cycle (only transmit half the time so the radio doesn't overheat). With image transmission taking two minutes, off time will probably be two minutes as well. It should be relatively easy to receive at least two complete images in one pass, with the possibility to receive up to three images if timing, conditions, and setup are ideal.

When the ISS comes into view/has line of sight with you, this is known as Acquisition of Signal, or AoS. The ideal situation for a high elevation 10 minute pass would be if the first image started transmitting exactly at your AoS, and you had a directional antenna so you could receive the signal even while the ISS was very low in the beginning and end of the pass.

In this case you would be able to receive three images like this:

<table>
<thead>
<tr><th>Minute</th><th>Image TX/Off</th></tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr><td>0 - 2</td><td>Complete image 1</td></tr>
<tr><td>2 - 4</td><td>TX off</td></tr>
<tr><td>4 - 6</td><td>Complete image 2</td></tr>
<tr><td>6 - 8</td><td>TX off</td></tr>
<tr><td>8 - 9</td><td>Complete image 3</td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>

The more common situation will be that the first image transmission will start either before or after AoS. In this case you will only have the opportunity to receive two complete images, but this is still twice the amount of images that were possible with PD180 which was the previous encoding employed by the ISS. The downside is the image quality is not as high as with PD180.

Even though you'll have the opportunity to receive two complete images, don't expect to. It may take practice and it will certainly take the right setup and conditions, to get just one complete image. With that said, here are some tips that may help you get more images and/or better images.

Check Twitter for #ISS #SSTV status and images: For several hours after the April and July 2015 SSTV events were scheduled to start, only a "blank signal" was transmitted. There was no audio so no images could be decoded. During these events Twitter users all over the world posted what they heard using hashtags #ISS #SSTV. As soon as people started hearing the SSTV audio, they reported it on Twitter.

By searching for these hashtags you can stay up to date on the current status of the transmissions, which sometimes go longer than scheduled. Maybe more importantly, you can also see all the images people are getting!

SSTV Status reports can also be found on ISS Fan Club on the right side of the page. For details on all reports on that website go to https://www.issfanclub.com/sstv-reports

Lastly, if you go to the AMSAT satellite status page you can see "ISS-SSTV" reports at the very bottom of the table. Yellow coloured cells mean it was heard. Red means it wasn't heard. Cells closer to the left are most recent. If you mouse over a cell you can see all the reports for that hour, who it was by, and in what 15 minute block of the cell hour it was relevant to.

Open the squelch; for weak signal work you always want to leave the squelch wide open to avoid missing any signals. Even though the radio used for ISS SSTV puts out 25 watts, which is a lot for an amateur radio satellite, the signal is still relatively weak when it's hundreds of miles away and hundreds of miles high. Don't miss any of the signal. Keep the squelch open.

This will also make it easier to identify the signal when it first comes in, or when the transmission first starts because the change between the high volume of the noise/static and the relative low volume of the transmitted signal will be more noticeable than if you had the squelch closed.

Record audio and decode later; during previous SSTV events some listeners didn't configure their SSTV apps/software for the right mode. Even though they received the signal/audio from the ISS, since the software wasn't configured properly, they decoded no images.

A wise choice would be to just record the audio from the radio and play it back later when you have time to experiment with different settings. This also makes it easier to fix slanted images/correct for bad sync, which are common issues.

If you decide to just record the audio and worry with decoding later, record the audio at a high quality to preserve as much of the original fidelity of the audio as possible, otherwise the quality of the image will suffer.

Test Decoding Software; it's really exciting to watch images decode live while receiving the SSTV transmission from the ISS. If you don't want to record the pass and decode later, or you want to decode live and record, make sure to test your decoding software so you know it will work at the moment of truth. To do this you'll need to play back an audio recording of an SSTV transmission created using the same mode as the ISS will be using.

https://youtu.be/fGBmUTESnC8

https://soundcloud.com/spacecomms/pd180-sstv-test-recording

https://www.dropbox.com/s/cgp5gtkzjdvm0m3/Space_Comms_PD180_SSTV_Test_Recording.mp3?dl=0

Try low elevation passes if you have a directional antenna; if you're using a directional antenna like an Arrow II antenna or a tape measure antenna, don't limit yourself to high elevation/altitude passes. With the 25 watt ISS SSTV transmissions, you can receive the signal from horizon to horizon. Even a pass with only a max elevation of five degrees can produce good images.

As usual I have run predictions for the Clubhouse at Novers Park Community Association. These will be more or less accurate for most people in the surrounding area but local Acquisition of Signal (AoS) and Loss of Signal (LoS) times will be affected by your local topography and your elevation. I usually find that AoS predictions at my QTH are 90 seconds or so early due to a local hill that artificially raises my horizon.

<table>
<thead>
<tr><th>Date (UTC)</th><th>AoS<br/>Acquisition of Signal<br/>(Time UTC)</th><th>Duration<br/>(Hr:Min:Sec)</th><th>AoS<br/>Acquisition of Signal<br/>Azimuth or Bearing (Degrees)</th><th>Maximum Elevation<br/>(Degrees)</th><th>Maximum Elevation<br/>Azimuth or Bearing (Degrees)</th><th>LoS<br/>Loss of Signal<br/>Azimuth or Bearing (Degrees)</th><th>LoS<br/>Loss of Signal<br/>(Time UTC)</th></tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr><td>08/02/19</td><td>18:20:13</td><td>00:10:04</td><td>283</td><td>23</td><td>226</td><td>144</td><td>18:30:17</td></tr>
<tr><td>08/02/19</td><td>19:57:52</td><td>00:05:51</td><td>264</td><td>3</td><td>239</td><td>198</td><td>20:03:43</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>11:05:31</td><td>00:06:58</td><td>174</td><td>6</td><td>133</td><td>91</td><td>11:12:29</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>12:39:38</td><td>00:10:16</td><td>223</td><td>28</td><td>169</td><td>76</td><td>12:49:54</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>14:15:41</td><td>00:10:45</td><td>257</td><td>83</td><td>174</td><td>81</td><td>14:26:26</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>15:52:14</td><td>00:10:46</td><td>277</td><td>88</td><td>216</td><td>100</td><td>16:03:00</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>17:28:45</td><td>00:10:26</td><td>284</td><td>33</td><td>191</td><td>132</td><td>17:39:11</td></tr>
<tr><td>09/02/19</td><td>19:05:48</td><td>00:07:52</td><td>273</td><td>8</td><td>233</td><td>178</td><td>19:13:40</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>10:15:46</td><td>00:04:39</td><td>152</td><td>2</td><td>126</td><td>100</td><td>10:20:25</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>11:48:35</td><td>00:09:48</td><td>211</td><td>20</td><td>152</td><td>78</td><td>11:58:23</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>13:24:16</td><td>00:10:43</td><td>248</td><td>67</td><td>156</td><td>78</td><td>13:34:59</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>15:00:46</td><td>00:10:46</td><td>273</td><td>85</td><td>352</td><td>93</td><td>15:11:32</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>16:37:18</td><td>00:10:41</td><td>284</td><td>48</td><td>190</td><td>122</td><td>16:47:59</td></tr>
<tr><td>10/02/19</td><td>18:14:02</td><td>00:09:04</td><td>279</td><td>13</td><td>219</td><td>163</td><td>18:23:06</td></tr>
</tbody>
</table>

If the above HTML Code does not present a clear table for you, please download the file ISSPasses.html which can be found in the PUBLIC DOWNLOADS folder at:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/i8jdu3xmmcagcir/AAAUHj3GC4qtxYfb693ui2G5a?dl=0

Once downloaded to your local device you can open this information in any modern web browser such as Firefox, Chrome, Chromium, Safari, Silk, MS Internet Explorer and the like.

About ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organising scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

--
73

Hon Sec SBARC
for and on behalf of SBARC
https://www.sbarc.co.uk